Quivira Coalition 2010 Conference, New Mexico – The Carbon Ranch – Using Food and Stewardship to Build Soil and Fight Climate Change

THE MICROBE REVERSAL . . . November 17- December 1, 2010

This is the first thing that has given me hope.”
Attendee speaking to 400 plus people at The Carbon Ranch conference

I am just back from presenting in New Mexico at the 2010 Quivira Coalition’s annual conference, this year entitled:  “The Carbon Ranch – Using Food and Stewardship to Build Soil and Fight Climate Change.” Craig Sponholtz, of DrylandSolutions.com, and I presented a 3+ hour symposium entitled “Bringing Life Back to Your Land: Moisture, Microbes and Climate Change.”  Each time I sit in a room with Craig I am more in awe of how he works with water.  I am very grateful to be collaborating with him and can’t wait to get back to New Mexico to do more work together.

First, I want to say that this was the most inspiring conference I have ever attended.  Quivira and Courtney White’s choices for speakers as well as the dozens and dozens of extraordinary attendees I spoke with out of the several hundred conference goers, have filled me with hope.   In one moment I’d be talking with a working rancher from New Mexico, then in another listening to John Wick and Jeff Creque of the Marin Carbon Project, California, then the next discussing with a US Forestry person soil microbiological strategies to deal with invasive weeds and mountains full of standing dead pines from pine beetle infestations, then I’d have an inspiring conversation with one of the young 20 something farmers associated with TheGreenHorns.net. Everyone was profoundly engaged.  We might just turn this thing around with the activities and energies of all attending and speaking at the conference.  If you get an opportunity to attend the conference next year or beyond, do it.  This might be THE conference to go to in the United States.

ClimateToday.org has a post with links to the presenters’ slides posted on a new Quivira Wiki.  You can find the post at:

http://climatetoday.org/?p=2758

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